Questions

questions

This Lord’s day, I am finding myself asking many questions.  Hard questions.  Questions for myself primarily, but questions that may help spur others on to deeper reflection as well.  Questions like these:

Why does our church life not seem to look like what we see in the book of Acts?  A church that is thriving, growing exponentially, and confronting the world because of how different the love of believers was for each other and for the world?  What are we doing wrong?  Is church just a social club for us; somewhere we go out of duty or because our friends and family go there and that is where we click?

When we sit down to read the Bible, what are we doing?  Are we reading it as God’s revelation to us of Himself and how to have a relationship with Him that reaches out to help others?  Or are we reading it merely out of obligation, to check off a box on our daily spiritual to-do list?  Do we really believe that as we know the mind of God we will be transformed more into His image?  Do we even read closely enough to remember what we read an hour after we finish?  Do we hunger and thirst for the word of God, or do we just coast by, reading when we are able?

When we pray, do we really believe we are communing with the God of the universe?  Do we really believe that the Spirit who rose Jesus from the dead dwells within us, and that we have access to the very throne of God by the grace of God which is ours in Jesus Christ?  Do we truly believe that prayer makes any difference, or do we merely pray as another part of our to-do list?  Do we stay in constant communion with God throughout the day (praying continually), or do we just set aside a set amount, no more and no less, to pray?  If the latter, how would our spouse feel if we did the same thing?  Do we believe that God loves us and wants to guide us through our lives as any loving parent would?

Do we really believe that Jesus’ death not only set us free from the wages of sin but also offered us a new life that begins now, an eternal kind of life that is being made stronger in us as we follow Him?  Do we really believe that Jesus came not just to forgive our sins but to take away our sins, increasing our level of holiness and purity day by day?  Do we believe that God actually wants to change us to be more like Christ, not just in totality when we die but in stages now as we live?  Or do we make excuses for ourselves when we give in to temptation to anger, lust, gossip, jealousy, worry, etc?

Do we really believe we are called not just to make converts, but to make disciples, people who will learn to follow Jesus in their lives, walking and talking as He would if He were living their lives in their place?  Do we realize that this is not just a command for us to reach out to strangers, but to disciple everyone we are able, especially those closest to us, such as our spouses and children?  Do we realize that to do this, we need to do more than just teach doctrine; we need to demonstrate a lifestyle of following Christ so that others may follow our example as we follow the example of Christ?  Are we allowing the seriousness of this expectation to influence our daily lives?

I could go on with questions, but that is quite a list as it is.  These are personal questions, so no one person can give an answer for someone else, as it will be different for each of us.  These are questions I am pondering in my own life, and they are hard hitting to me.  I hope that reflecting on them will help you in your walk as well.

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Book Review – ESV The Psalms

psalm cover

One thing I have to say for Crossway, they know Bibles, and they know how to produce some beautiful editions.

I requested a copy of their standalone edition of the Psalms to review, and Crossway was kind enough to oblige.  I am very glad they did.

The ESV Psalms contains nothing in it but the Psalms from a traditional Bible.  Each psalm is a standalone section, unlike most Bibles where one psalm immediately follows another on a page.  The paper is a thicker, more book-like paper as opposed to a traditional thinner Bible paper.  The overall size is 4.5 inches by 6.5 inches.  It comes with a smyth-sewn binding and a ribbon bookmark.

I received the top grain leather edition, and it is wonderful to hold.  It comes in a clamshell box to protect the book. When you take it out, the leather has a matte finish, and it is very soft.  If this were a traditional Bible with thin pages, I have no doubt it would lay flat on every page.  Because of the thicker pages, however, it will not really lay flat.  This is in no way a defect of the Psalms, as the thick pages were intentional. The leather cover is also wrapped around the edges of the front and back cover.

psalm 1

psalm 2

psalm 3

psalm 5

As with all of Crossway’s genuine leather Bibles, it comes with a lifetime guarantee against manufacturing defects with normal use.  I can personally attest that Crossway honors this guarantee, going above and beyond what they have to.  Their promise is to replace a defective Bible with a Bible of “equal or greater value,” and they stand by their promise.

psalm 4

The text itself is 11 point font, and it is presented in a single-column format (which is quickly becoming my favorite Bible layout).  The text color is black, except for the psalm heading, the verse numbers, and the book dividers (the psalms are actually a collection of five books).

At the bottom of each page is the psalm number, a one-line title/summary of the psalm, and the page number.

psalm 6

psalm 7

This edition of the psalms is a wonderful edition to any library.  It is a nice break to sit and read the psalms with this edition since it causes the reader to focus on each unit rather than getting lost in multiple psalms per page.  I could see this being used as part of a prayer time, praying through various psalms as Donald Whitney recommends.

If you are looking for a unique presentation of the psalms, look no further.  This edition from Crossway is both useful for devotions and elegant in its artistic design.  You will not regret purchasing one for yourself.

*Note: I received a complimentary copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

Book Review – “The Spiritual Warfare Answer Book” by David Jeremiah

spiritual warfare

If you are looking for a quick reference guide for the basics of spiritual warfare, The Spiritual Warfare Answer Book by David Jeremiah and published by Thomas Nelson may be what you are looking for.

It is a small hardcover book.  The front cover feels like it is padded.  It has a presentation page in case it is purchased as a gift for someone.

The book is broken down into about 5 topics (terms of engagement, behind enemy lines, God’s armory, the warfare of prayer) in the table of contents.  Under each topic are a list of questions, and the answers to those questions make up the contents of the book.  Sample questions are “Why study spiritual warfare?”, “Are we really in a war?”, “How powerful is Satan?”, “How do I arm myself with the girdle of truth?”, and “What does it mean to be ‘watchful’ in prayer?” After the questions and answers the book contains a warrior’s prayer, and two Scripture reference guides: a spiritual warfare reference guide and a prayer reference guide.  There is also a topical index.

The book is a quick read that covers the basics of spiritual warfare.  If you are looking for something that delves down deeper into spiritual warfare, you will want to look elsewhere. But for a quick guide to familiarize someone with the topic, it is a good read.

*Note: I was provided with a complimentary copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.